FREE Shipping On All Orders

  • MY CART    0

    Your cart is currently empty.

The Secret Meanings behind Popular Spring Wedding Florals

Posted on 25 April 2017

Spring has finally sprung, which means it’s time for wedding season and all things floral. Although working with silk flowers allows us to choose any kind of bloom at any time of year, we can’t deny that there’s something sensational about a seasonal trend.
 
What you may not know is that each budding beauty has its own special story and meaning. So before you finalize the most fragrant part of your wedding day, let us enlighten you on the essence of spring’s most popular blooms.
 

Dahlias

Bursting with texture and found in a variety of pastel colors, these beauties are sure to add dimension to your wedding arrangements. Dahlias originated in Central and South America and their name means “from the valley.” Much like weddings, dahlias are symbols of grace and commitment.
   

Photo courtesy of: Ruffled Blog

 

Tulips

Dating back centuries to Eastern and Northern Europe, tulips are richly royal and completely classic. These flowers are not only known for their fresh fragrance, but also for symbolizing passionate and enduring love and nobility. The Victorian era crowned the tulip for a sign of charity.
   

Photo courtesy of: Brides.com

 

Peonies

Oh, peonies. Often grown in Eastern countries such as Japan and China, these perfect plumes represent romance, honor, wealth and, in some cultures, bashfulness. Peonies are named after Paean—the healer and physician of gods in Greek mythology.
   
Shop Marmalade Floral's spring peony bouquet here.
        

Photo courtesy of: Marmalade Floral

 

Anemones

Anemones are moody blooms and are sure to make a statement in any arrangement. These flowers of intense contrast are found all over the world and—depending on location and culture—have mixed meanings. Some cultures associate anemones with anticipation while others assume them to be protection against ill-fate or foul wishes.
       

Photo courtesy of: Southern Living

 

Irises

Although irises bloom mostly through summer, they start in early spring. Incorporating them into your wedding plans will ensure you are treated like a queen—every bride’s dream! Named after Iris, the messenger of the Greek gods, these vibrant flowers symbolize royalty, wisdom, hope and valor.
      

Photo courtesy of: Weddingomania

More Posts

Join our Mailing List

Sign up to receive 10% off of your first order!

Search our store